A Collection for You of All the Past Parings of My Nails

To Jane Mecom Dear Sister London, Dec. 24. 1767 I have received yours of Oct. 23. and condole with you most affectionately in the Affliction you must have suffered by the Loss of so valuable and so amiable a Child. The longer we live we are expos’d to more of these Strokes of Providence: but …

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American Longevity

To the PRINTER of the LONDON CHRONICLE. SIR, I have often heard it remarked, that our Colonies in North America were unhealthy and unfavourable to long life; and more particularly so upon their first settlement. In opposition to this groundless notion, I here send you two paragraphs taken from the Pensylvania Gazette of July 16, …

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Condemn’d to Live Together and Tease One Another

To Margaret Stevenson Dear Madam Tuesday, Nov. 3 at Noon I breakfasted abroad this Morning and Nanny tells me that Mr. West call’d while I was out, and left word that you did not intend to come home till Sunday next, and that you expected me then, to come and fetch you; that Mr. West …

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Travelling is One Way of Lengthening Life

To Mary Stevenson Dear Polly Paris, Sept. 14. 1767 I am always pleas’d with a Letter from you, and I flatter myself you may be sometimes pleas’d in receiving one from me, tho’ it should be of little Importance, such as this, which is to consist of a few occasional Remarks made here and in …

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Of Lightning, and the Method (Now Used in America) of Securing Buildings and Persons from Its Mischievous Effects

Experiments made in electricity first gave philosophers a suspicion that the matter of lightning was the same with the electric matter. Experiments afterwards made on lightning obtained from the clouds by pointed rods, received into bottles, and subjected to every trial, have since proved this suspicion to be perfectly well founded; and that whatever properties …

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