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Patriotic Jury

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol I. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859.

A trial about a disputed horse race that has been run on Rye Flats, came on to-day before Peter Guion, Esq., at Besley’s tavern, at New Rochelle. One of the parties demanded a jury, and the justice accordingly issued a process. A number of the inhabitants were summoned and appeared, but unanimously refused to be sworn, declaring that as horse-racing was contrary to the Association of the Congress,1 they would never serve as jurors in any such cause, and that if the judge thought proper to commit them, they would go to jail. In short, the justice was obliged to try the cause himself. 2

 

1 See Article 8th of the Association of Congress, in Journals of Congress, Oct. 20, 1774.
2 Holt’s Journal, April 6.