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Tryon’s Raid on Cow Pasture

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859.

The sun being nearly set before the 64th, the Landgrave’s regiment, and the Jagers were in the boats, it was near nine o’clock in the evening [July 11] when the troops landed at the Cow Pasture, a peninsula on the east of the harbor, within a mile and & half of the bridge which formed the communication between the east and west parts of Norwalk, nearly equally divided by a salt creek. The King’s American regiment being unable to join the army before three the next morning, the troops lay that night on their arms.

In the march at the first dawn of day, the 54th led the column, and soon fell in with the rebel outposts, and driving the enemy with great alacrity and spirit, dispossessed them of Drummond (Grummon) Hill, and the heights at the end of the village, east from and commanding the bridge.

It being now about four o’clock in the morning and the rebels having taken post within a random cannon shot upon the hills on the north, the troops halted, and the second division landing at the Old Wells, on the west side of the harbor, had advanced and formed the junction.

General Garth’s division passed the bridge by nine, and proceeded to the north end of the village, from whence, and especially from the houses, there had been a fire for five hours upon our advanced guards. The fusileers, supported by the light infantry of the guards, began the attack, and soon cleared that quarter, pushing their main body and a hundred cavalry from the northern heights, and taking one piece of their cannon.

After many salt pans were destroyed, whale boats carried on board the fleet, and the magazines, stores, and vessels set in flames, by which the greater part of the dwelling-houses were consumed, the advanced corps were drawn back, and the troops retired in two columns to the place of their first debarkation, and unassaulted took ship and returned to Huntington Bay.1

 

1 Excerpt from an article in Gaine’s Mercury, August 12.

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