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Frances Marion, Personal Correspondence, Jan. 1781

Gen. Marion to Capt. John Postell.

Goddard’s Plantation,1 Pedee, Jan. 19, 1781.

Dear Sir,

I send Lieut. King with fifteen men, to reinforce you. I would have all the flats and boats you can collect, loaded with rice, and sent to Mr. Joseph Allston’s plantation, on Bull’s creek, to the north of Pedee, where there is a ferry to Euhaney; and the rice is to be there stored, and the boats kept going until all that is beat out in your district is carried. From there I will send for it up higher. You must take such negroes for the boats as belong to those persons who may be with the enemy, or from those estates which the enemy think forfeited. Gen. Greene is in want of a number of negroes — say fifty — for the use of the army. You will collect them in your district, and send them to me; taking care not to distress any family, but taking them where they can be best spared. I shall detain those negroes that came up with the boats you have sent. One boat has arrived, and I have sent to assist in getting up the others. I beg you would give me intelligence of the movements of the enemy in Georgetown, and, if possible, their particular strength: what corps of horse and foot, and how many militia, and if there are any cannon mounted on their redoubt, and whether they are making any new works. You will send Capt. W—-, and Mr. S—-, and all such men (who have taken, or are suspected of having taken part with the enemy) to me. You must not suffer any person to carry property where the enemy has possession, or have any intercourse with them.

I am, with regard, dear Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Francis Marion.

1 Snow’s Island.

———-
Extract of a Letter from Gen. Marion to Capt. Postell.
January 19, 1781.

Dear Sir,

Your father may keep the canoe you mention. I have received the prisoners, by Mr. M`Pherson,1 and shall give them the pleasure of seeing head quarters.

I am, dear Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Francis Marion.

1 Depeyster’s company of grenadiers.

———-

Gen. Greene to Gen. Marion.

Camp, on Pedee, Jan. 19, 1781.

Dear Sir,

The enclosed letter, from Capt. Odingsells, came to hand last evening, I have directed him to apply to you for orders on the subject. I have detached Major Anderson, with one thousand regulars, and one hundred Virginia militia, to attack and disperse the tories at Mr. Amy’s mill, on Drowning creek. The party marched yesterday, with orders to endeavour to surprise them; perhaps you might be able to make some detachment that would contribute to their success. By the last accounts, Lieut. Col. Tarleton was in motion, with about one thousand troops, towards Gen. Morgan, who is in the fork of Broad river. Lord Cornwallis is moving in force to cover him. I wish your answer respecting the practicability of surprising the party near Nelson’s; the route, and force you will be able to detach. This inquiry is a matter that requires the greatest secrecy.

I am, dear Sir,
Your most obedient humble servant,
N. Greene.

———-

Gen. Greene to Gen. Marion.

Camp,1 Jan. 22, 1781.

Sir,

I have received your letter of the 18th, containing an account of the several little skirmishes between your people and the enemy, which were clever and do them much honour. I am sorry that so few horses fit for service are to be had in your quarter, as we are in great want. Get as many as you can, and let us have fifteen or twenty sent to camp without loss of time, they being wanted for immediate service. Major Hyrne who is appointed deputy commissary general of prisoners, has settled the business with Mr. Walter. I beg you will please to favour me with weekly returns of the militia serving under you, and the number of horses you have in service, and the particular duties on which they are employed, to be made every Monday morning. I also wish separate returns of the continental troops serving with you, the rank and names of the officers, and the corps to which they belong.

I am, Sir,
Your most obedient servant,
N. Greene.

1 Camp Hicks.

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