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Frances Marion, Personal Correspondence, Feb. 1781

Gen. Greene to Gen. Marion.

Camp, at Guilford Court House, Feb. 11, 1781.

Dear Sir,

I received your favour of the 31st ult. and request you to give my particular thanks to Major and Capt. Postell for the spirit and address with which they executed your orders over the Santee. Your crossing the Santee must depend upon your own discretion. I think it would be attended with many advantages, if it can be executed with safety. Gen. Sumter is desired to call out all the militia of South Carolina and employ them in destroying the enemy’s stores and perplexing their affairs in the state. Please to communicate and concert with him your future operations until we have a better opportunity to have more free intercourse. Great activity is necessary to keep the spirits of the people from sinking, as well as to alarm the enemy respecting the safety of their posts. We formed a junction at this place last night, but our force is so much inferior to the enemy’s that we dare not hazard a general action if it can be avoided, but I am not certain that it can. The enemy are within thirty miles of us, up towards the shallow ford on the Yadkin.

I am, dear Sir,
Your most obedient humble servant,
N. Greene.

———-

Gen. Greene to Gen. Marion.

Camp, at Halifax Court House, Virginia, Feb. 16, 1781.

Dear Sir,

I have seen your letter to Gen. Huger of the 6th inst. and am surprised that Col. Baker or Capt. Snipes should pretend that they had my directions for crossing the Santee. I beg you will encourage the militia and engage them to continue their exertions. — If the supplies expected from the northward arrive in season, we shall be able to assist you. The movements of the enemy were so rapid, that few of the militia joined us on our march from Pedee, which reduced us to the necessity of passing the Dan, or risking an action on very unequal terms. The enemy are upon the banks of the river, but the people of this country appear to be in earnest. I hope we shall soon be able to push Lord Cornwallis in turn. I wrote to you from Guilford, which I hope you have received.

I am, dear Sir,
Your most obedient servant,
N. Greene.

 

 

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