Silence Dogood, No. 10

Optime societas hominum servabitur. Cic. To the author of the New England Courant. SIR, Discoursing lately with an intimate Friend of mine of the lamentable Condition of Widows, he put into my Hands a Book, wherein the ingenious Author proposes (I think) a certain Method for their Relief. I have often thought of some such …

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Silence Dogood, No. 9

Corruptio optimi est pessima. To the author of the New England Courant. SIR, It has been for some Time a Question with me, Whether a Common-wealth suffers more by hypocritical Pretenders to Religion, or by the openly Profane? But some late Thoughts of this Nature, have inclined me to think, that the Hypocrite is the …

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Silence Dogood, No. 8

To the author of the New England Courant. SIR, I prefer the following Abstract from the London Journal to any Thing of my own, and therefore shall present it to your Readers this week without any further Preface. ‘Without Freedom of Thought, there can be no such Thing as Wisdom; and no such Thing as …

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Silence Dogood, No. 7

Give me the Muse, whose generous Force, Impatient of the Reins, Pursues an unattempted Course, Breaks all the Criticks Iron Chains. Watts. To the author of the New England Courant. SIR, It has been the Complaint of many Ingenious Foreigners, who have travell’d amongst us,That good Poetry is not to be expected in New-England. I am …

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Silence Dogood, No. 6

Quem Dies videt veniens Superbum, Hunc Dies vidit fugiens jacentem. Seneca. To the author of the New England Courant. SIR, Among the many reigning Vices of the Town which may at any Time come under my Consideration and Reprehension, there is none which I am more inclin’d to expose than that of Pride. It is acknowledg’d by …

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