Federalist No 80, The Powers of the Judiciary

From McLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: TO JUDGE with accuracy of the proper extent of the federal judicature, it will be necessary to consider, in the first place, what are its proper objects. It seems scarcely to admit of controversy, that the judicary …

Continue reading ‘Federalist No 80, The Powers of the Judiciary’ »

Federalist No 79, The Judiciary Continued

Advertisements

From MCLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: NEXT to permanency in office, nothing can contribute more to the independence of the judges than a fixed provision for their support. The remark made in relation to the President is equally applicable here. In the general …

Continue reading ‘Federalist No 79, The Judiciary Continued’ »

Federalist No 78, The Judiciary Department

From McLEAN’S Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: WE PROCEED now to an examination of the judiciary department of the proposed government. In unfolding the defects of the existing Confederation, the utility and necessity of a federal judicature have been clearly pointed out. It is …

Continue reading ‘Federalist No 78, The Judiciary Department’ »

Federalist No 77, The Appointing Power Continued…

Advertisements

…and Other Powers of the Executive Considered From the Independent Journal Wednesday, April 2, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: IT HAS been mentioned as one of the advantages to be expected from the co-operation of the Senate, in the business of appointments, that it would contribute to the stability of …

Continue reading ‘Federalist No 77, The Appointing Power Continued…’ »

Federalist No 76, The Appointing Power of the Executive

From the New York Packet Tuesday, April 1, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: THE President is “to nominate, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States …

Continue reading ‘Federalist No 76, The Appointing Power of the Executive’ »