Category Archives: 3. Miscellaneous

Articles of Beliefs and Acts of Religion

IN TWO PARTS. Here will I hold —— If there is a Pow’r above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud, Thro’ all her Works), He must delight in Virtue And that which he delights in must be Happy. Cato. PART I. Philada. Nov. 20 1728. First Principles I believe there is one Supreme most perfect Being, Author and Father of the Gods themselves. For I believe that Man is not the most perfect Being but One, rather that as there are many Degrees of Beings his Inferiors, so there are many Degrees of Beings superior to him. Also, when I stretch my Imagination thro’ and beyond our System of Planets, beyond the visible fix’d Stars themselves, into … Continue reading

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Monday Night, March 24

I have received Letters lately from several considerable Men, earnestly urging me to write on the Subject of Paper-Money; and containing very severe Reflections on some Gentlemen, who are said to be Opposers of that Currency. I must desire to be excus’d if I decline publishing any Thing lent to me at this Juncture, that may add Fuel to the Flame, or aggravate that Management that has already sufficiently exasperated the Minds of the People. The Subject of Paper Currency is in it self very intricate, and I believe, understood by Few; I mean as to its Consequences in Futurum: And tho’ much might be said on that Head, I apprehend it to be the less necessary for me to handle it … Continue reading

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A Modest Enquiry into the Nature and Necessity of a Paper-Currency

Quid asper Utile Nummus habet; patriae, charisq; propinquis Quantum elargiri deceat. —— Pers. There is no Science, the Study of which is more useful and commendable than the Knowledge of the true Interest of one’s Country; and perhaps there is no Kind of Learning more abstruse and intricate, more difficult to acquire in any Degree of Perfection than This, and therefore none more generally neglected. Hence it is, that we every Day find Men in Conversation contending warmly on some Point in Politicks, which, altho’ it may nearly concern them both, neither of them understand any more than they do each other. Thus much by way of Apology for this present Enquiry into the Nature and Necessity of a Paper Currency. And … Continue reading

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On the Providence of God in the Government of the World

When I consider my own Weakness, and the discerning Judgment of those who are to be my Audience, I cannot help blaming my self considerably, for this rash Undertaking of mine, it being a Thing I am altogether ill practis’d in and very much unqualified for; I am especially discouraged when I reflect that you are all my intimate Pot Companions who have heard me say a 1000 silly Things in Conversations, and therefore have not that laudable Partiality and Veneration for whatever I shall deliver that Good People commonly have for their Spiritual Guides; that You have no Reverence for my Habit, nor for the Sanctity of my Countenance; that you do not believe me inspir’d or divinely assisted, … Continue reading

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Doctrine to Be Preached

That there is one God Father of the Universe. That he is infinitely good, Powerful and wise. That he is omnipresent. That he ought to be worshipped, by Adoration Prayer and Thanksgiving both in publick and private. That he loves such of his Creatures as love and do good to others: and will reward them either in this World or hereafter. That Men’s Minds do not die with their Bodies, but are made more happy or miserable after this Life according to their Actions. That Virtuous Men ought to league together to strengthen the Interest of Virtue, in the World: and so strengthen themselves in Virtue. That Knowledge and Learning is to be cultivated, and Ignnorance dissipated. That none but … Continue reading

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