Federalist No 85, Concluding Remarks

From MCLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: ACCORDING to the formal division of the subject of these papers, announced in my first number, there would appear still to remain for discussion two points: “the analogy of the proposed government to your own State constitution,” …

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Federalist No 84, Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections…

…to the Constitution Considered and Answered From McLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: IN THE course of the foregoing review of the Constitution, I have taken notice of, and endeavored to answer most of the objections which have appeared against it. There, however, remain …

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Federalist No 83, The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury

From MCLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: THE objection to the plan of the convention, which has met with most success in this State, and perhaps in several of the other States, is that relative to the want of a constitutional provision for the …

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Federalist No 82, The Judiciary Continued

From McLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: THE erection of a new government, whatever care or wisdom may distinguish the work, cannot fail to originate questions of intricacy and nicety; and these may, in a particular manner, be expected to flow from the establishment …

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Federalist No 81, The Judiciary Continued…

…and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority From McLEAN’s Edition, New York Wednesday, May 28, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: LET US now return to the partition of the judiciary authority between different courts, and their relations to each other. “The judicial power of the United States is” (by the …

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