The Continental Army, Chapter I

The Army of Observation: New England in Arms On 19 April 1775 local Massachusetts militiamen and regular British troops began the War of American Independence at Lexington and Concord. The New England colonists reacted to this news by raising four separate armies. Each jurisdiction formed its force according to its particular experience in earlier wars …

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The Eve of the Revolution, Chapter VI: Testing the Issue

The die is now cast; the colonies must either submit or triumph.–George III. We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among, these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.–Thomas Jefferson. Two months and ten days after …

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Expedition against the Onondagas

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. April 24.—This afternoon, the detachment sent out last Monday on an expedition against the Indians at Onondaga,1 returned to Fort Schuyler. The following account of it is given by a writer in the New York Packet:—”An enterprise against the …

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“Old Lies Renewed”

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol I. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. April 19. –By a late arrival from England we have the following, which are but the old lies renewed: –Government proposes to have in America, in the spring, foreign troops, consisting of Hessians, Brunswickers, Hanoverians, and Waldeckers, seventeen thousand; …

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The Battle of Lexington

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol I. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. April 19. –About ten o’clock last night, the troops in Boston were discovered to be in motion in a very secret manner, and it was found they were embarking in boats which they had privately brought to the place …

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