The Battle of Camden, Part 3

PART IIISTRENGTH AND LOSSES OF THE TWO ARMIESBRITISH STRENGTH AND LOSSESThe field return of the troops under command of Lieutenant General Lord Cornwallis on the night of the 15th of August, 1780, and the return of the killed, wounded, and missing in the Battle of Camden give the following figures. It will be noted that …

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The Battle of Camden, Part 2

PART IIBRITISH PLANS TO SUBJUGATE THE SOUTHERN PROVINCES—BATTLE OF CAMDEN, S. C., AUGUST 16,1780THE BRITISH RAISE PROVINCIAL CORPS AND MILITIAWhen General Clinton and Admiral Arbuthnot departed from Charleston on the 5th day of June, to return to New York, General Cornwallis was left in command of the British expeditionary force in South Carolina. His headquarters …

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The Battle of Camden, Part I

PART IAN AMERICAN ARMY ORGANIZED TO RECOVER THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA FROM BRITISH SUBJUGATIONREVIEW OF MILITARY CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1780The principal battle grounds of the first four years of the War for Independence, waged by the thirteen Colonies against the mother country, were located in the Northern States, following which period, …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter IX

The War in the South After 1778 there was no more decisive fighting in the North. The British plan was to hold New York and keep there a threatening force, but to make the South henceforth the central arena of the war. Accordingly, in 1779, they evacuated Rhode Island and left the magnificent harbor of …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter VI

The First Great British Disaster John Burgoyne, in a measure a soldier of fortune, was the younger son of an impoverished baronet, but he had married the daughter of the powerful Earl of Derby and was well known in London society as a man of fashion and also as a man of letters, whose plays …

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