The Continental Army, Chapter II

The Continental Army: Washington and the Continental Congress Formation of a New England army in the first months after Lexington marked the first phase in the military struggle with England, but even as the regional army gathered before Boston, a significant step in the creation of a national force was being taken in Philadelphia. The …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter VI

The First Great British Disaster John Burgoyne, in a measure a soldier of fortune, was the younger son of an impoverished baronet, but he had married the daughter of the powerful Earl of Derby and was well known in London society as a man of fashion and also as a man of letters, whose plays …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter III

Independence Well-meaning people in England found it difficult to understand the intensity of feeling in America. Britain had piled up a huge debt in driving France from America. Landowners were paying in taxes no less than twenty per cent of their incomes from land. The people who had chiefly benefited by the humiliation of France …

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The Eve of the Revolution, Chapter VI: Testing the Issue

The die is now cast; the colonies must either submit or triumph.–George III. We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among, these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.–Thomas Jefferson. Two months and ten days after …

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Fight at Kingsbridge, New York

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. July 9.—In the evening of the 2d, Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerick marched with one hundred men, drawn from the regiments of the line, from the encampment near New York, to Phillips’ house; as, the next morning, a number of wagons, under …

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