Washington and His Comrades: Chapter II

Boston and Quebec Washington was not a professional soldier, though he had seen the realities of war and had moved in military society. Perhaps it was an advantage that he had not received the rigid training of a regular, for he faced conditions which required an elastic mind. The force besieging Boston consisted at first …

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The Eve of the Revolution, Chapter IV: Defining the Issue

A pepper-corn, in acknowledgement of the right, is of more value than millions without it.–George Grenville. A perpetual jealousy respecting liberty, is absolutely requisite in all free states.–John Dickinson. Good Americans everywhere celebrated the repeal of the Stamp Act with much festivity and joyful noises in the streets, and with “genteel entertainments” in taverns, where …

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Federalist No 64, The Powers of the Senate

From the Independent Journal Wednesday, March 5, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: IT IS a just and not a new observation, that enemies to particular persons, and opponents to particular measures, seldom confine their censures to such things only in either as are worthy of blame. Unless on this principle, …

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Hubbell at Lloyd’s Neck

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. March 10.—Captain Hubbel, of the Associated Loyalists, has had another encounter with the pious Presbyterians at Lloyd’s Neck.1 This spirited officer, with his little band of true Englishmen, has made three attempts to effect the business pointed out to …

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