The Continental Army: Chapter VI

Professionalism: New Influences From Europe The winter encampment at Valley Forge was an extremely important period in the development of the Continental Army. Despite numerous problems, for the first time in the war the Army enjoyed a winter free from the need to recruit and reorganize most of the regiments. Congress and military leaders used …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter VIII

The Alliance with France and its Results Washington badly needed aid from Europe, but there every important government was monarchical and it was not easy for a young republic, the child of revolution, to secure an ally. France tingled with joy at American victories and sorrowed at American reverses, but motives were mingled and perhaps …

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Federalist No 66, Objections to the Power of the Senate…

…To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered From the Independent Journal Saturday, March 8, 1788 To the People of the State of New York: A REVIEW of the principal objections that have appeared against the proposed court for the trial of impeachments, will not improbably eradicate the remains of any unfavorable impressions which …

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The French and British Fleets meet off Virginia

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. March 28.—Chevalier d’Astouches, with the French fleet, lately returned to Rhode Island from an unsuccessful encounter with the British squadron in the Chesapeake. The subjoined relation of his recent operations, is given by a writer at Newport:— “The gale …

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Francis Marion, Personal Correspondence, Mar. 1781

Gen. Marion to Lieut. Col. Balfour. Santee, March 7, 1781. Sir, I sent Capt. John Postell with a flag to exchange some prisoners, which Capt. Saunders, commandant of Georgetown, had agreed to, but contrary to the law of nations, he has been seized and detained as a prisoner. As I cannot imagine that his conduct …

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