Washington and His Comrades: Chapter IX

The War in the South After 1778 there was no more decisive fighting in the North. The British plan was to hold New York and keep there a threatening force, but to make the South henceforth the central arena of the war. Accordingly, in 1779, they evacuated Rhode Island and left the magnificent harbor of …

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Francis Marion, Chapter III, Campaign of 1781, part 1

The year 1781 commenced under auspices more propitious than those of the last year. The British had exercised so much oppression and rapacity over all those who would not join them, and so much insolence over those who did, and were in the least suspected, that the people of South Carolina found there was no …

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Battle of Fort Motte

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. The evacuation of Camden animated the friends of Congress, and daily increased their numbers; while the British posts fell in quick succession. The day after the evacuation, the garrison of Orangeburgh, consisting of seventy British militia and twelve regulars, …

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The Siege of Charleston

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. May 12.—This morning the garrison of Charleston, after sustaining a siege of over a month’s duration, surrendered prisoners of war to the combined fleet and army of Great Britain. The following is a journal of the siege, from the …

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