Washington and His Comrades: Chapter VI

The First Great British Disaster John Burgoyne, in a measure a soldier of fortune, was the younger son of an impoverished baronet, but he had married the daughter of the powerful Earl of Derby and was well known in London society as a man of fashion and also as a man of letters, whose plays …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter II

Boston and Quebec Washington was not a professional soldier, though he had seen the realities of war and had moved in military society. Perhaps it was an advantage that he had not received the rigid training of a regular, for he faced conditions which required an elastic mind. The force besieging Boston consisted at first …

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Mordecai M. Noah to James Madison

New York May 6 1818 Dear sir, I take the liberty to enclose to you a Discourse delivered at the consecration of the Jewish Synagogue in this City1, under the fullest persuasion, that it cannot but be gratifying to you, to perceive this portion of your fellow Citizens, enjoying an equality of privileges in this …

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The Siege of Charleston

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. May 12.—This morning the garrison of Charleston, after sustaining a siege of over a month’s duration, surrendered prisoners of war to the combined fleet and army of Great Britain. The following is a journal of the siege, from the …

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Operations in the South – British Account

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. May 29.—A correspondent in Charleston, South Carolina, gives the following account of the late movements of the two armies at the southward:—”On the twenty-eighth of April, a party of the British army, under the command of Major Fraser, landed …

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