Battle of King’s Mountain

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. October 30.—Colonels Campbell and Sevier have taken a great part of Cornwallis’ army, and a precious crew of Tories, at King’s Mountain.1 The battle took place on the 7th instant, and lasted more than an hour.2 The following is …

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Losses at King’s Mountain

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From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. The following is a statement of the loss in this battle, as given by Colonels Campbell, Cleveland, and Shelby:— Of the regulars, one major, one captain, two sergeants, and fifteen privates killed; thirty-five privates wounded, left on the ground …

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Benedict Arnold’s Letter to the Inhabitants of America

I should forfeit, even in my own opinion, the place I have so long held in yours, if I could be indifferent to your approbation, and silent on the motives which have induced me to join the King’s arms. A very few words, however, shall suffice upon a subject so personal; for to the thousands …

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The Siege of Savannah

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From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. [Paragraphs added for readability.] The chief-justice of Georgia, in a letter to his wife, dated November ninth, gives the following particular account of the siege of Savannah: Soon after my arrival, I made application to the barrack-master to be …

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Anecdote of Burgoyne

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol I. Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. October 18. –On the morning of the seventh instant, General Burgoyne invited General Frazer to breakfast with him. In the course of their conversation, Frazer told General Burgoyne that he expected in a day or two to be in …

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