The Continental Army, Chapter VII

Perseverance to Victory The first two years of the War of American Independence witnessed the growth of the Continental Army from a nucleus of New England and New York units patterned after the Provincials of earlier wars into a force with men from every state as well as foreign volunteers. Through those volunteers, particularly Steuben …

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Washington and His Comrades: Chapter XI

Yorktown The critical stroke of the war was near. In the South, after General Greene superseded Gates in the command, the tide of war began to turn. Cornwallis now had to fight a better general than Gates. Greene arrived at Charlotte, North Carolina, in December. He found an army badly equipped, wretchedly clothed, and confronted …

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Francis Marion, Chapter III, Campaign of 1781, part 2

Col. Watson was considered by the British one of their best partisans; yet we have seen how he was foiled. Had his regiment attempted, as was no doubt intended, to ford the river at the lower bridge, they would have found the passage narrow, and the river at that time deep; or had he undertaken …

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Francis Marion, Chapter III, Campaign of 1781, part 1

The year 1781 commenced under auspices more propitious than those of the last year. The British had exercised so much oppression and rapacity over all those who would not join them, and so much insolence over those who did, and were in the least suspected, that the people of South Carolina found there was no …

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British Account of Eutaw Springs

From Diary of the American Revolution, Vol II.  Compiled by Frank Moore and published in 1859. The rebel army having been augmented by recruits from their continental battalions and militia, drawn from the disaffected parts of North and South Carolina, to upwards of four thousand men, General Greene was induced to act offensively. The reports …

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